Thursday, October 31, 2019

Introduction (Belletti and Collins 2019)

This paper is the introduction to the volume on Smuggling to appear (OUP) edited by Adriana Belletti and Chris Collins.

Belletti and Collins 2019

Thursday, October 24, 2019

Thought as Syntax


Abstract: In this paper, I outline an approach to the study of thought from a syntactic point of view. I propose that sentences (in the sense of generative syntax) are thoughts. Under that assumption, I use natural language syntax as a probe into the structure of our thoughts, and show how such a probe sheds light on how we make deductions and our capacity for imagination.

Keywords: thought, syntax, logic, semantics, imagination

Monday, October 21, 2019

A Smuggling Approach to the Adjunct/Argument Asymmetry


In this mini-squib, I sketch an approach to the adjunct/argument asymmetry that is based on smuggling. 

Sunday, October 20, 2019

Syntactic Tip of the Day


These tips were originally posted on Facebook with the dates given. I will now try to maintain a running list on my blog, in reverse chronological order.

Saturday, October 19, 2019

Basic Consultant Skills for Linguistic Fieldwork


I have recently had the pleasure of working with a number of new consultants. I took the opportunity to jot down some of the basic skills that they needed to learn in my sessions with them.

Saturday, October 12, 2019

Training Program: Linguistic Fieldwork on the Khoisan Languages of Botswana


Training Program: Linguistic Fieldwork on the Khoisan Languages of Botswana
(Supported in part by NSF Award BCS-1760980)

Thursday, October 10, 2019

Some notes on the EPP (by Jeffrey Punske)


The EPP can be a vexing principle for early practitioners of Chomskyan syntactic theories. This is, in part, because the theoretic apparatus that underlie the EPP have been shifted away from. Yet, the EPP in some form generally remains. Thus, the goal of this blog post is to sketch a brief history of the EPP and outline its current status. I will also discuss some remaining potential issues with the EPP.

Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Two Kinds of Data in Syntactic Fieldwork


This blog post is a prelude to future blog post: Why Video? In that blog post I will tackle the question of why a generative syntactician, like me, should care about video? But before I get to that point, I need to tackle some background issues concerning the source of data in syntactic fieldwork.

Sunday, October 6, 2019

Syntactic Puzzle


(partially taken from Facebook post on August 16, 2018)
I came up with this puzzle while visiting Erich Groat at his cabin in upstate NY.

Saturday, October 5, 2019

Some things I learned in the Peace Corps that helped me with linguistic fieldwork.


I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Togo from 1985 to 1987. Here is a short list of things I learned then that have been helpful to me in doing linguistic fieldwork ever since (especially in Togo, Namibia and Botswana).

Friday, October 4, 2019

Solar Power for Linguistic Fieldwork


Here is my solar power set up for 2019-2020. Some of this post is modified from a Facebook post on December 19, 2015, when I had a similar set-up. The whole system cost roughly 740 US dollars (panel, inverter, controller and battery). There are photos of the set-up at the end of the post.

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Tips for Recording Sound when Shooting Video in Linguistic Fieldwork


I am a linguist doing linguistic fieldwork on highly endangered Khoisan languages. Part of my project is to produce video documentation of people speaking those languages.

As a beginning film maker, I have found the following tips to be useful in obtaining high quality sound recordings to accompany video. I have learned most of these the hard way, by actually making mistakes.